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2006 Archived MEDALS NEWS

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28 November 2006 - Erebus Special Service medal to be awarded

16 October 2006 - Afghanistan Service Recognised by United States

14 October 2006 - Bravery awards to Five NZDF Personnel in the special Honours List

4 September 2006 - New Zealand Antarctic Medal

8 August 2006 - Approval for the Acceptance and Wear of the United Nations Medal for service in the Sudan

14 July 2006 - 1000th NZGSM (Solomon Islands) approved

27 June 2006 - Issue of Malaysian Medal to New Zealand Veterans

19 May 2006 - Approval for the Acceptance and Wear of the United States Navy Presidential Unit Citation by the NZ SAS in Afghanistan

19 May 2006 - Approval for the Acceptance and Wear of the United Nations Special Service Medal for service in Afghanistan, Iraq, and with UNOTIL (in Timor-Leste since 20 May 2005), and the European Security and Defence Policy (ESDP) Service Medal for service in Bosnia and Herzegovina (since 2 December 2004)

31 March 2006 - First Presentation of the Pingat Jasa Malaysia (PJM) Medal to New Zealand Veterans

30 March 2006 - New medal for Asian Tsunami relief efforts presented

Erebus Special Service medal to be awarded

28 November 2006

Prime Minister Helen Clark today announced that the New Zealand Special Service Medal (Erebus) will be awarded to those who were involved in the recovery, investigation, and identification operation following the Erebus air disaster.

Today, 28 November, is the 27th anniversary of the disaster.

Helen Clark said that the medal will be awarded to an initial group of 133 police and other personnel who took part in the response to the tragedy of the crash of Air New Zealand flight TE 901 on Mt Erebus, Ross Island, Antarctica, on 28 November 1979, with the loss of all 257 on board.

“The crash of flight TE 901 was without question the bleakest moment in the history of New Zealand’s fifty year presence in Antarctica. The work of those involved in what was called Operation Overdue was critical in supporting the victims' families and helping our nation come to terms with the tragic deaths of so many people.

"The recovery team at the crash site consisted of experienced Search and Rescue personnel, including police and Federated Mountain Club members, together with support personnel. Victims recovered from the crash site were flown to Auckland for identification by teams of pathologists, dentists, and police.

Helen Clark said that until the Government had instituted the NZSSM in 2002 there was not a suitable way of recognizing the extraordinary service of those involved in Operation Overdue.

This new medal recognises service or work for New Zealand in very difficult, adverse, extreme, or hazardous circumstances which falls outside the boundaries of what individuals could normally expect as part of their routine duties or work. A Special Service Medal was last awarded in 2005 to recognise New Zealanders who were involved in rescue, relief, and rehabilitation efforts in areas devastated by the Boxing Day 2004 earthquake and tsunami.

“The work of personnel involved at Mt Erebus far exceeded the boundaries of what could be expected in the course of normal police, search and rescue, or air accident investigation duties. The circumstances were extreme: a hazardous physical location, extreme climatic conditions, dangers presented by the wreckage, the psychological strain of recovering the victims, and highly demanding physical work,” Helen Clark said.

“This medal also recognises the unique psychological risks faced by those who worked to identify successfully 214 of the 257 victims. The identification team’s complex work was exhaustive and painstaking. It was undertaken in harrowing circumstances well outside the boundaries of what would normally be expected in the course of routine duties.

Police Minister Annette King said a small number of medal recipients are still serving with the NZ Police.

"They include Sergeant David Templeton who worked with the disaster victim identification teams in Auckland, and who was recently awarded the New Zealand Bravery Decoration. Southern District Commander Superintendent George Fraser also worked in the Auckland Mortuary.

“Additional former police personnel and civilians will also be eligible for the medal. Available records have not enabled us to identify everyone involved with Operation Overdue. The Government would like other eligible people, or the families of any eligible Operation Overdue personnel who have since died, to make an application for the medal," Annette King said.

Defence Minister Phil Goff said the NZSSM (Erebus) will be administered by the New Zealand Defence Force, on behalf of the NZ Police. All applications for the medal should be made on the appropriate application form which will be available on the New Zealand Defence Force Medals website.

Application forms should be sent to: Assistant Director Medals Policy, Personnel Branch, Headquarters New Zealand Defence Force, Private Bag, Wellington, New Zealand.

Ceremonies to award the New Zealand Special Service Medal (Erebus) will be held in the coming months.

The initial list of 133 eligible New Zealand Police personnel who will receive the NZSSM (Erebus) can be viewed here.

Further information on the Erebus disaster can be found on the following pages of the NZ History.net website:

http://www.nzhistory.net.nz/culture/respondingtotragedy-erebus

http://www.nzhistory.net.nz/gallery/797

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Afghanistan Service Recognised by United States

16 October 2006

Defence Minister Phil Goff welcomed the awarding of medals today by the United States to 17 members of the New Zealand Defence Force.

"Ten New Zealanders have been awarded the Bronze Star and seven have been awarded the United States Army Commendation Medal in recognition of exemplary service in Afghanistan between 2004 and 2005", said Mr Goff.

"The recipients of these awards served in a wide variety of roles and undertook a range of tasks. Most were acknowledged for their work with the New Zealand Provincial Reconstruction Team in Bamyan but several received awards for work in staff or headquarters roles.

"We are proud of the way our forces have served in Afghanistan and what they have achieved. New Zealanders have contributed to Bamyan becoming one of the most stable, secure and progressive provinces in Afghanistan.

"The special skill of New Zealanders in peacekeeping and security missions has been to work alongside local people and to win their confidence, respect and friendship.

"Recognition of the exemplary service of New Zealanders on operational service by other nations is rare. The recipients of these awards can take justifiable pride in their achievements in a demanding and challenging environment.

"New Zealand and the United States have a significant and long-standing defence relationship. These awards are an acknowledgement by the United States Government of the high value which is placed on the contribution made by New Zealanders to Operation Enduring Freedom.

"Fourteen of the recipients will receive their awards from US Ambassador, William McCormick, in a ceremony at the United States Embassy in Wellington today", said Mr Goff.

The Bronze Star was instituted in 1944 and is awarded for the performance of heroic or meritorious acts. The United States Army Commendation Medal was instituted in 1945 and is awarded for acts of achievement or meritorious service. All the awards made to New Zealanders for service in Afghanistan are for meritorious service.

The full text of Minister of Defence Phil Goff's speech on 16 October 2006 can be viewed here.

United States Bronze Star (obverse view)United States Army Commendation Medal (obverse view)

Captions: Left: United States Bronze Star (obverse view); Right: United States Army Commendation Medal (obverse view)

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Bravery awards to Five NZDF Personnel in the special Honours List

14 October 2006

Five New Zealand Defence Force personnel have been awarded bravery awards in the Special Honours List 14 October 2006.

The New Zealand Bravery Medal has been awarded to:

- Sergeant Philip Samuel BLAKEMAN, Royal New Zealand Air Force, for his actions on 3 June 2004;

- Able Hydrographic Systems Operator Keran Mana DURRANT, Royal New Zealand Navy (Retired), and
Able Chef Tyson Wiremu JOB, Royal New Zealand Navy, for their actions on 16 August 2004;

- Staff Sergeant Dion Wayne PALMER, Royal New Zealand Army Education Corps, for his actions on 17 January 2004; and

- Squadron Leader Shaun Paul SEXTON, Royal New Zealand Air Force, for his actions on 3 June 2004.

Information (including the award citations) on all New Zealand military personnel who have been awarded New Zealand gallantry and bravery awards since 1999 can be accessed through the links provided on the New Zealand Gallantry and Bravery awards page of the NZDF medals website.

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New Zealand Antarctic Medal

4 September 2006

Prime Minister Helen Clark today announced that The Queen has approved the institution of The New Zealand Antarctic Medal.

The new medal replaces the British Polar Medal and continues the tradition begun in 1904 of recognising the significant contribution which New Zealanders have made, and continue to make, to the protection and knowledge of Antarctica.

Helen Clark said that the criteria for the award of the Medal were developed in close consultation with those organisations with a close interest in the Antarctic.

The Medal may be awarded to New Zealanders and other persons who either individually or as members of the New Zealand programme in the Antarctic region have made an outstanding contribution to either exploration, scientific research, conservation, environmental protection, or knowledge of the Antarctic region, or in support of New Zealand’s objectives or operations, or both, in Antarctica.

"The New Zealand Antarctic Medal is an important addition to New Zealand’s honours system. The first recipients will be announced in the 2007 New Years Honours list.

"In keeping with the importance to New Zealand of the Antarctic region, the new medal will enjoy a precedence comparable to that of the Queen’s Service Medal. Recipients will be entitled to use the post-nominal letters “N.Z.A.M.” and, in addition, will receive their awards at the regular investitures at Government House.

"The new medal will be made of Sterling Silver, and retains the famous octagonal shape and white ribbon of the Polar Medal. The reverse design shows a group of four Emperor Penguins on an Antarctic landscape with Mt Erebus in the background. The obverse bears an effigy of The Queen and the inscription Elizabeth II Queen of New Zealand. The medal was designed by Phillip O’Shea, CNZM, LVO, New Zealand Herald of Arms," Helen Clark said.

Note: The New Zealand Antarctic Medal will not be awarded for acts of bravery, for short-term acts of extreme endurance, for long service or for service in Antarctica generally.

Further information may be found on the New Zealand Antarctic Medal page of the Honours Secretariat website.

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APPROVAL FOR THE ACCEPTANCE AND WEAR OF THE UNITED NATIONS MEDAL FOR SERVICE IN the Sudan

8 August 2006

Her Majesty The Queen has recently given Her approval for the unrestricted acceptance and wear of the following foreign award:

The United Nations Medal for service in the Sudan with the United Nations Mission in Sudan (UNMIS) since 17 September 2005.

Those personnel who are eligible, and who have been awarded the UN Medal for service with UNMIS, may now wear the medal. The medal is to be worn as a campaign medal in the order in which it was earned.

The service being recognised

The United Nations Mission in Sudan (UNMIS) was established on 24 March 2005 to support the implementation of the Comprehensive Peace Agreement signed between the Government of Sudan and the Sudan Peoples’ Liberation Movement/Army (SPLM/A) in Nairobi on 9 January 2005.

Since 17 September 2005, the New Zealand Defence Force (NZDF) has contributed two military observers (UNMOs), and one staff officer, to serve with UNMIS on six-month rotations. As at 8 August 2006, six NZDF officers have served in the Sudan with UNMIS.

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1000th NZGSM (Solomon Islands) approved

14 July 2006

On 30 June 2006, the 1000th award of the New Zealand General Service Medal (Solomon Islands) was approved for operational service since 5 June 2000 in the Solomon Islands. As at 14 July 2006, 1055 personnel have qualified for this medal.

The Service or Organisation of the recipients of these 1055 NZGSM (Solomon Islands) are listed below:

Service or Organisation Number of Medals Awarded
NZ Army 523
RNZAF 246
RNZN 34
NZ Police 244
Other NZ Government Departments (including MFAT and MAF)
8
Grand Total: 1055


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Issue of Malaysian Medal to New Zealand Veterans

27 June 2006

Defence Minister Phil Goff announced today that the general distribution by courier of the Pingat Jasa Malaysia (PJM) Medal to eligible New Zealanders who served in Malaya / Malaysia between 1957 and 1966 is to begin shortly. The issue of this medal is a Malaysian government initiative to recognise service in Malaya, Borneo, and Singapore.

“The New Zealand Defence Force (NZDF), with the assistance of the Malaysian Ministry of Defence, will now undertake the issue of PJM Medals. Defence has acted as the agent for the Malaysian Government in the acceptance and vetting of applications for the PJM Medal. The distribution of the PJM Medal is the logical next step in the process of ensuring that the medal is awarded to eligible New Zealand veterans in a timely manner”, Phil Goff said.

“To date, over 2,600 applications for the PJM Medal have been received and vetted by HQNZDF. The cased medals will be couriered by Defence to eligible New Zealand veterans. The medals will be issued in alphabetical order, by surname of the applicant, to veterans resident in New Zealand and overseas. It is anticipated that the issue of the more than 2,600 medals will take several weeks to complete”, Phil Goff said.

The PJM Medal was instituted by His Majesty the King of Malaysia to commemorate service by the British Commonwealth Forces to safeguard Malaysia’s sovereignty during the Communist Insurgency and the Indonesian Confrontation. The PJM Medal honours the valour and sacrifices made by the New Zealand Forces who served in Malaya / Malaysia for at least 90 days, between 31 August 1957 and 31 December 1966. This also includes service in Singapore up to 9 August 1965.

Eligible veterans, and the families of deceased veterans, are encouraged to apply for the PJM Medal, if they have not already done so. Application forms should be sent to: Medals Office, Headquarters New Zealand Defence Force, Private Bag 905, Upper Hutt, New Zealand.

Further details on the eligibility criteria for the award of the PJM Medal, and application forms, are available from the NZ Defence Force Medals website.

Related media statements:

31 March 2006 - First Presentation of the Pingat Jasa Malaysia (PJM) Medal to New Zealand Veterans

7 September 2005 - New Zealanders eligible for Malaysian military medal

11 July 2005 - New Zealanders in line for Malaysian military medal

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APPROVAL FOR THE ACCEPTANCE AND WEAR OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY PRESIDENTIAL UNIT CITATION FOR SERVICE BY THE NZ SAS IN AFGHANISTAN.

19 May 2006

Her Majesty The Queen has recently given Her approval for the unrestricted acceptance and wear of the following foreign award:

The United States Navy Presidential Unit Citation (USNPUC) by the New Zealand Special Air Service, for service in Afghanistan between 17 October 2001 and 30 March 2002.

On 7 December 2004, George Bush, President of the United States of America, formally presented the United States Navy Presidential Unit Citation to the New Zealand Special Air Service (SAS) at a ceremony held at the Marine Corps Air Station, Miramar, California. The United States Navy Presidential Unit Citation was awarded to those units which comprised the Combined Joint Special Operations Task Force - SOUTH/Task Force K-BAR (CJSOTF-SOUTH/TF K-BAR) in Afghanistan between 17 October 2001 and 30 March 2002. These units were drawn from the United States, New Zealand, Canada, Norway, Denmark, Germany, Australia, and Turkey. New Zealand was represented at the presentation ceremony by the Commanding Officer of the SAS.

United States Navy Regulations state that the United States Navy Presidential Unit Citation is ‘awarded in the name of the President of the United States of America to units of the United States Armed Forces and cobelligerent nations for extraordinary heroism in action against an armed enemy. The unit must have accomplished its mission under such extremely difficult and hazardous conditions to set it apart from and above other units participating in the same campaign.’

The award of the United States Navy Presidential Unit Citation is an acknowledgment by the United States Government of the high value which is placed on the contribution made by the SAS to Operation Enduring Freedom. The missions undertaken by the SAS were performed within the operational area defined in the New Zealand General Service Medal (Afghanistan) Regulations 2002.

Gordon England, the Secretary of the United States Navy, was the approving authority for the United States Navy Presidential Unit Citation presented to CJSOTF-SOUTH/TF K-BAR. Gordon England was among those who attended the 7 December 2004 presentation ceremony.

Those eligible personnel may now wear the dress distinction of the USNPUC on the right breast. Personnel who served with the SAS in CJSOTF-SOUTH/TF K-BAR during the period recognised by the unit citation (17 October 2001 to 30 March 2002) can wear the dress distinction at all times. Personnel who did not serve in Afghanistan with CJSOTF-SOUTH/TF K-BAR between 17 October 2001 and 30 March 2002, including those who joined the SAS after the end date for the citation, will only wear the dress distinction while they are serving with the unit.

Stocks of the dress distinction are currently being sourced by HQNZDF, and will be available in due course from 1 NZSAS GP.

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APPROVAL FOR THE ACCEPTANCE AND WEAR OF THE UNITED NATIONS SPECIAL SERVICE MEDAL FOR SERVICE IN AFGHANISTAN, IRAQ, AND WITH UNOTIL (IN TIMOR-LESTE SINCE 20 MAY 2005), AND THE EUROPEAN SECURITY AND DEFENCE POLICY (ESDP) SERVICE MEDAL FOR SERVICE IN BOSNIA AND HERZEGOVINA (SINCE 2 DECEMBER 2004)

19 May 2006

Her Majesty The Queen has recently given Her approval for the unrestricted acceptance and wear of the following foreign awards:

a) the United Nations Special Service Medal (UNSSM) for service in Afghanistan with the United Nations Assistance Mission in Afghanistan (UNAMA) since 28 March 2002;

b) the United Nations Special Service Medal (UNSSM) for service in Iraq with the United Nations Assistance Mission for Iraq (UNAMI) since 14 August 2003;

c) the United Nations Special Service Medal (UNSSM) with clasp “Timor Leste” for service in Timor-Leste with the United Nations Office in Timor-Leste (UNOTIL) since 20 May 2005; and

d) the European Security and Defence Policy (ESDP) Service Medal for service in Bosnia and Herzegovina with the European Union force (EUFOR) since 2 December 2004.

Those eligible personnel, who have been awarded the UNSSM for service with UNAMA, UNAMI, or UNOTIL, or the ESDP Service Medal for service with EUFOR, may now wear the appropriate medal. Each medal is to be worn as a campaign medal in the order in which it was earned.

The Chief of Defence Force has given approval for those personnel who have been awarded a NATO medal for service in Bosnia on or before 1 December 2004, and who complete the qualifying service for the award of the ESDP Service Medal after 2 December 2004, to wear both medals on New Zealand Defence Force uniform.

The UNSSM with clasp “Timor Leste” is the first, and (to date) only, UNSSM to be issued with a clasp. The decision to issue (or not issue) a clasp for a specific mission recognised by the UNSSM rests with United Nations Headquarters in New York. The New Zealand Government does not have the authority to institute clasps to the UNSSM.

The service being recognised

The United Nations Assistance Mission in Afghanistan (UNAMA) was established on 28 March 2002 to promote national reconciliation, fulfil the tasks and responsibilities entrusted to the United Nations in the Bonn Agreement (including those related to human rights, the rule of law and gender issues), and manage all United Nations’ humanitarian relief, recovery and reconstruction activities in Afghanistan in co-ordination with the interim Afghan Government. These tasks continue to be undertaken in co-ordination with the Afghan Government elected in 2004.

Since December 2004, the New Zealand Defence Force (NZDF) has contributed one military liaison officer to serve with UNAMA, on a six-month rotation. As at 19 May 2006, three NZDF officers have served in Afghanistan with UNAMA.

The United Nations Assistance Mission for Iraq (UNAMI) was established on 14 August 2003 to manage all United Nations’ humanitarian relief, recovery and reconstruction activities in Iraq, and to co-ordinate humanitarian relief, recovery and reconstruction activities with Iraq-based international non-government organisations (NGOs).

Since January 2005, the NZDF has contributed one military advisor to serve with UNAMI, on a six-month rotation. As at 19 May 2006, three NZDF officers have served in Iraq with UNAMI.

The United Nations Office in Timor-Leste (UNOTIL) was established on 20 May 2005 to support the development of critical state institutions, partly by providing training and advisory support to security-related organisations. The small military component of UNOTIL is entirely devoted to border security, through the provision of military liaison officers on Timor-Leste’s land border with Indonesia, and military training advisors who are involved with the training of the Timorese Border Patrol Unit.

Since 20 May 2005, the NZDF has contributed one military training advisor to serve with UNOTIL, on a six-month rotation. As at 19 May 2006, two NZDF officers have served in Timor-Leste with UNOTIL.

The European Union Force (EUFOR). Since 1996, the NZDF has provided personnel to serve on various peace support missions in Bosnia. Between 1996 and 2004, these missions were NATO-led, but from 2 December 2004 the European Union took over leadership of the European Union Force (EUFOR) which supports the peace agreement for Bosnia and Herzegovina. The aim of the EUFOR mission is to help Bosnia and Herzegovina make the transition to a safe and secure environment, following years of ethnic-based conflict. The NZDF’s participation in the mission in Bosnia continues under European Union leadership.

As at 19 May 2006, 28 NZDF personnel have completed the 30 days’ qualifying service with EUFOR required for the award of the ESDP Service Medal.

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first presentation of the Pingat Jasa Malaysia (PJM) Medal to New Zealand Veterans

31 March 2006

The first presentations by the Government of Malaysia to eligible New Zealand veterans of the Pingat Jasa Malaysia (PJM) Medal took place today at the High Commission of Malaysia in Wellington.

Tan Sri Dato’ Sri Subhan Jasmon, Secretary General, Ministry of Defence, Malaysia, who is currently visiting New Zealand, presented PJM Medals to nineteen veterans who served in Malaya and Malaysia with the Royal New Zealand Navy, the New Zealand Army, the Royal New Zealand Air Force and the Federation of Malaya Police between 1957 and 1966. Recipients included Lieutenant-General Don McIver (Retired), Leonard Knapp, the President of the New Zealand Malayan Veterans’ Association, and Warrant Officer Reece Golding, Royal New Zealand Navy, one of two serving New Zealand Defence Force personnel who are eligible for the medal.

The PJM Medal recognises service by New Zealand military personnel in the defence of Malaya and Malaysia during the Malayan Emergency and the Confrontation. The medal also recognises service in direct support of the defence of Malaya and Malaysia by Royal New Zealand Navy and Royal New Zealand Air Force personnel. Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth has given Her approval for unrestricted acceptance and wear of the PJM Medal by eligible New Zealand veterans.

New Zealand and Malaysia enjoy a long-standing and valuable defence relationship. The award of the PJM Medal to New Zealand is an acknowledgment of the value which the Government of Malaysia places upon the contribution made by New Zealanders to the security of Malaysia and to the region.

The 11 July 2005 and 7 September 2005 media statements concerning the offer and acceptance of the PJM medal can be viewed on the Archived Medals News 2005 page of the NZDF Medals website.

How to apply (updated 8 November 2013)

To apply for the PJM medal please complete either NZDF Medals Office Form No. 1 (for your own medal) or Form No. 2 (for the medal of a deceased relative).

Update 4 May 2006:

To date, approximately 2,600 applications for the PJM Medal have been received by HQNZDF. Over 1,200 names and addresses have already been forwarded to the High Commission of Malaysia, Wellington. The staff at the Medals Office are in the process of vetting the remainder of the applications.

Related media statements:

27 June 2006 - Issue of Malaysian Medal to New Zealand Veterans

7 September 2005 - New Zealanders eligible for Malaysian military medal

11 July 2005 - New Zealanders in line for Malaysian military medal

New medal for Asian Tsunami relief efforts presented

30 March 2006

Prime Minister Helen Clark today presented the New Zealand Special Service Medal (NZSSM) (Asian Tsunami) to 29 New Zealanders who served in areas affected by the Boxing Day tsunami.

The medals were presented at a ceremony in Parliament's Legislative Council Chamber.

"New Zealanders responded to the disaster rapidly, professionally, and with great compassion," Helen Clark said.

"The NZSSM (Asian Tsunami) recognises service including locating missing New Zealanders, identifying victims, and other humanitarian relief, rehabilitation, and reconstruction work."

Helen Clark praised the dedication of the medal recipients, who had worked in some of the most difficult and hazardous conditions imaginable.

"The risk of aftershocks, the dangers of disease and infection, the extensive - and in some instances complete - devastation of affected areas, and the trauma of treating the injured, of recovering bodies, and identifying victims presented the most harrowing physical and psychological challenges."

Today's medal recipients were involved in relief efforts in Aceh Province (Indonesia), Phuket (Thailand) and Sri Lanka. They include personnel from the New Zealand Police, the New Zealand Defence Force, the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade, civilians and representatives from aid agencies and New Zealand media.

The government announced the creation of the medal on the first anniversary of the disaster. The medal is awarded to New Zealanders who worked in areas devastated by the earthquake and tsunami between 26 December 2004 and 26 December 2005. More people are likely to receive the medal in coming months.

The ceremony, also attended by Defence Minister Phil Goff, Police Minister Annette King and Foreign Affairs Minister Winston Peters, concluded with a minute's silence for the victims of the tsunami.

Attached is a full list of today's recipients of the NZSSM (Asian Tsunami).

NZSSM (Asian Tsunami) recipients

New Zealand Police (location of service: Phuket, Thailand)
Senior Sergeant Geoffrey Logan, Wellington (44 days in Phuket)
Superintendent Hamish McCardle, Wellington (21 days in Phuket)
Constable Philip Simmonds, Christchurch Central (105 days in Phuket)
Constable Karl Wilson, Photographer, Auckland (98 days in Phuket)

New Zealand civilians who operated with the New Zealand Police Disaster Victim Identification teams in Phuket, Thailand
Mr Warren Bell, Dentist, Auckland (20 days in Phuket)
Mr Simon Stables, Pathologist, Auckland (44 days in Phuket)
Colonel Hugh Trengrove, Wellington (22 days in Phuket)

New Zealand Defence Force (location of service: Banda Aceh, Indonesia)
Captain Jacqueline Claridge (doctor)
Able Medic Joanna Fraser (medic)
Lance Corporal Luke Tamatea (security role)
Staff Sergeant Linda Manuel (logistics support role)
Lieutenant Commander Mark Meehan (staff officer and liaison role)
Major Charmaine Pene (command role)
Lieutenant Colonel Evan Williams (command role)

New Zealand Red Cross
Douglas Clark (location of service: Galle, Sri Lanka)
Colleen Clarke (location of service: Aceh Province, Indonesia)
Marion Picken (location of service: Aceh Province, Indonesia)

Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade (location of service: Phuket, Thailand)
Brett Bartos
Sarah Craig
Graeme McGuire
Jeremy Palmer

Oxfam New Zealand
Les Collins (location of service: Aceh Province, Indonesia)
Dave Neru (location of service: Aceh Province, Indonesia)
Richard Weaver (location of service: Batticaloa, Sri Lanka)

Kate Medlicott (location of service: Batticaloa, Sri Lanka), whose medal was accepted on her behalf by Richard Weaver

World Vision New Zealand
Brett Campbell (location of service: Aceh Province, Indonesia)
Sriya Fernando (location of service: Ampara, Sri Lanka)

New Zealand media
Charlotte Glennie (location of service: Phuket and Banda Aceh)
Ingrid Leary (location of service: Banda Aceh)

The full text of Prime Minister Helen Clark's speech on 30 March 2006 can be viewed here.

Further presentations of the NZSSM (Asian Tsunami) to the more than 230 other eligible recipients will be co-ordinated by the organisations with which individuals served.

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 This page was last reviewed 8 November, 2013 and is current.