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2017 Archived MEDALS NEWS

NZ Defence Service Medals presented at Parliament on 14 April 2011.

DFO 6, Part 1 - Defence Force Orders for Honours and Awards

28 August 2017

The Chief of Defence Force (CDF) has approved DFO 6, Part 1 - Defence Force Orders for Honours and Awards (pdf format 5.54 MB). (Note: This link will only work on the NZDF intranet).

This is the first part of a two-part series of orders that cover the operation of the New Zealand Royal Honours System in the New Zealand Defence Force (NZDF).

Part 1 is a comprehensive document of 24 Chapters intended to provide a "one-stop-shop" on all things related to honours and awards. It explains the important relationships between CDF, the Prime Minister and the Sovereign, the structure of the Honours System and the conventions, customs and practices that guide its operation, as well as defining key responsibilities. There are detailed processes governing the management of nominations, how they are processed and assessed, and the way in which awards are notified and presented. Direction is also provided on the wearing of honours and awards and there is a new policy on forfeiture, cancellation and restoration.

DFO 6 reflects the changes that have taken place in the Honours System since the Prime Minister's Honours Advisory Committee issued its report in 1995 that signalled the end of awards of British honours in New Zealand. It provides for a modern system of official recognition that will support the strategic direction of the NZDF out to 2035.

DFO 6 supersedes most of the content of DFO 4 Chapter 11 Honours and Awards; the affected content of which will be deleted. Single Service Orders will also be amended.

SADFO 13/2014 Chief of Defence Force Commendation, Chief of Defence Force Letter of Recognition, dated 16 September 2014 is cancelled.

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NZDF personnel named in Queen's Birthday Honours List 2017

5 June 2017

 

The New Zealand Distinguished Service Decoration obverse view

NZDF Media Release

Five New Zealand Defence Force (NZDF) personnel have been named in the 2017 Queen’s Birthday Honours List today.

The recipients are:

To receive the New Zealand Distinguished Service Decoration (DSD):

Staff Sergeant Tina Kathleen Grant, RNZAMC
For services to the New Zealand Defence Force

Brigadier Anthony Bryan (Ants) Howie, ONZM
For services to the New Zealand Defence Force

Squadron Leader Nicholas Michael Pedley, RNZAF
For services to the New Zealand Defence Force

Major Charmaine Maurita Tate, RNZAMC
For services to the New Zealand Defence Force

Major Andrew James Thornton, RNZALR
For services to the New Zealand Defence Force

The New Zealand Distinguished Service Decoration (DSD) recognises distinguished military service by regular, territorial and reserve members of the New Zealand Defence Force, including command and leadership and service in an operational environment, or in support of operations.

Photos of the five recipients are on the main NZDF website.

The Citations for the Awards

Staff Sergeant Tina Kathleen Grant, RNZAMC

For services to the New Zealand Defence Force

Staff Sergeant Tina Grant is the New Zealand Army’s liaison for families that have lost family members while in the service of the New Zealand Defence Force, whether it be on operations or in New Zealand.

Staff Sergeant Grant has been a strong advocate for the provision of enduring care by the New Zealand Defence Force for affected families. Following the loss of her husband on operations in 2011 she identified shortcomings in post-casualty support and duty of care by the Army and wider Defence Force. She identified a range of practical services typical of what affected parties could be required to navigate through in times of grief, loss and trauma, and identified simple processes and solutions. In 2012 she was appointed to the newly created function of Army Liaison Officer and primary point of contact for all Army families that have lost family members while in service. She has developed her role further by also reaching out to former Army families who lost members while they were in the service of the Defence Force. She performs voluntary work as an ex-offico member of the Royal New Zealand Returned and Services Association, and the Fallen Hero’s Trust. Staff Sergeant Grant has contributed to wider NZDF initiatives now underpinning a cohesive framework of support for Regulars, Reserves, Civilians, Veterans and their families.

Brigadier Anthony Bryan (Ants) Howie, ONZM

For services to the New Zealand Defence Force

Brigadier Ants Howie was seconded from September 2011 as the Senior Military Adviser to the United Nations Political Office for Somalia (UNPOS), and was subsequently appointed as the Senior Military Adviser to the United Nations Assistance Mission in Somalia (UNSOM) until 2016.

He was a member of the Defence Sector Reform Unit, which formed part of the larger Rule of Law and Security Institutions Group for UNSOM. He built confidence and interacted regularly with the main supporters of security sector reform in Somalia, namely the USA, UK, EU, UAE, Turkey, the African Union Mission in Somalia (AMISOM), and with the African Union Peace and Support Commission in Addis Ababa. His success in this role led to him being assigned by the UN to take charge of an expanded Defence Sector Reform Unit. As co-chair of the Defence Working Group, he successfully brought all Somali and international partners together to develop and agree to a single plan to support the Somali National Army and its joint operations with AMISOM against Muslim extremists. Brigadier Howie’s work in the areas of defence reform, strategy development and force generation have contributed significantly to the peace and security of the region.

Squadron Leader Nicholas Michael Pedley, RNZAF

For services to the New Zealand Defence Force

Squadron Leader Nicholas Pedley has undertaken 50 years of service in the Royal Air Force and Royal New Zealand Air Force as a military pilot, flying instructor and instructor trainer. He began his flying career in 1966 and flew operationally with the Royal Air Force in a range of aircraft.

In the late 1970s he qualified as a Pilot Instructor, Instrument Rating Examiner and as one of the few instructors qualified to train other pilot instructors. He joined the RNZAF in 1986 to fly with No. 14 Squadron, and was its commanding officer from 1989 to 1992. After a period as a staff officer, he resumed flying duties in 1999 as an instructor at the Pilot Training Squadron and Central Flying School. In addition to his flying duties he was also a member of the Red Checkers display team. In 2014 he was one of the first RNZAF pilots to complete a conversion course to the new T-6C Texan trainer. He has performed the demanding role of instructing instructors for more than 30 years, with pilots trained or influenced by Squadron Leader Pedley going on to conduct military operations and occupy positions at the highest leadership levels of the Royal New Zealand Air Force and in the wider aviation industry.

Major Charmaine Maurita Tate, RNZAMC

For services to the New Zealand Defence Force

Major Charmaine Tate was first operationally deployed as a Medical Officer to East Timor in 2002 and was the Regimental Medical Officer for 1NZSAS Regiment from 2004 until 2013.

As Regimental Medical Officer she deployed on several occasions to Afghanistan, was a member of the New Zealand medical team in Sumatra following the 2004 Boxing Day Tsunami and has also been involved with New Zealand Search and Rescue. Following the February 2011 Christchurch earthquake she commanded Urban Search and Rescue medical teams and later that same year was sent to assist in Japan following the major earthquake and tsunami in March. She has been dedicated to supporting Defence Force personnel and their families, especially those in the Special Forces community suffering from deployment-related illnesses and often long after they have left military service. Much of her medical development and training has been completed outside the Defence Force and at a personal cost and she has undertaken professional military training and education not usually associated with specialist officers in order to provide a military context for her professional medical duties. Major Tate has gone beyond the normal requirements and expectations of the New Zealand Defence Force in performance of her medical duties.

Major Andrew James Thornton, RNZALR

For services to the New Zealand Defence Force

Major Andrew Thornton served as a Military Liaison Officer with the United Nations Mission in South Sudan (UNMISS) from September 2015 to March 2016, and was also appointed Operations Officer in Malakal.

During his deployment, 18 UNMISS personnel and 13 logistics contractors on a barge travelling along the Nile were taken hostage by a large South Sudanese rebel group and a team was sent to negotiate their release. Negotiations were conducted in the presence of heavily armed soldiers, and the rebels threatened to shoot down any helicopter that came too close to the site of the negotiations without their clearance. At the conclusion of negotiations an anti-aircraft machine gun fired several rounds at the helicopter sent to evacuate the hostages. Major Thornton was a lead planner for the recovery operation and co-ordinated the helicopter evacuation. He personally attended the negotiation site and utilised his previous personal relationships with the rebel leadership to support the United Nations negotiators in securing the release of the hostages. Major Thornton’s leadership and local knowledge were key to the success of the recovery operation, particularly given the limited capacity of local government agencies to execute such an operation, and the mistrust that existed between the South Sudanese parties involved and the United Nations.

Related media statements:

31 December 2016 - Service as Soldier and Musician Recognised in New Year Honours

6 June 2016 - NZDF personnel named in the Queen's Birthday Honours List 2016


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Service at Bougainville Peace Talks Qualifies for Medal

23 February 2017

The New Zealand Operational Service Medal

Caption: The New Zealand Operational Service Medal

NZDF Media Release

New Zealanders who served at the Bougainville peace talks in July and August 1990 are now eligible for the New Zealand Operational Service Medal.

Recent research by the New Zealand Defence Force has determined that service at the peace talks in Bougainville by members of the New Zealand Defence Force and Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade staff met the risk threshold to be awarded a medal.

Royal New Zealand Navy ships Endeavour, Waikato and Wellington were deployed for nine days to provide the venue and accommodation for the peace talks in Keita Harbour and off the coast of Bougainville. This mission was known as Operation Big Talk.

Chief of Defence Force Lieutenant General Tim Keating said awarding the New Zealand Operational Service Medal to those involved in Operation Big Talk was an appropriate way to recognise their valuable contribution to the peace effort in Bougainville.

“About 400 persons who served on Operation Big Talk now qualify to be awarded the New Zealand Operational Service Medal,” Lieutenant General Keating said.

The New Zealand Operational Service Medal, instituted in 2002, recognises service of seven days or more on operational service for New Zealand since 3 September 1945. It is awarded once only to an individual, regardless of how many times he or she has deployed on operations.

Applications for the medal should be sent to New Zealand Defence Force Personnel Archives and Medals. The application form (Form No. 1 - MD1050) can be downloaded from the New Zealand Defence Force Medals website. More details about eligibility for the medal are on the website.

Service on Operation Big Talk can also be counted towards the 30 days of operational service in Bougainville required to be awarded the New Zealand General Service Medal 1992, with Clasp 'Bougainville'. Persons who served on Operation Big Talk and returned later to Bougainville may have accumulated enough days to be awarded the New Zealand General Service Medal.

Dates of service on Operation Big Talk

HMNZS Endeavour - 28 July 1990 to 5 August 1990 (9 days' operational service during the peace talks in Bougainville)
HMNZS Waikato - 28 to 31 July 1990 and 2 to 5 August 1990 (8 days' operational service during the peace talks in Bougainville)
HMNZS Wellington - 29 July 1990 to 3 August 1990, and 5 August 1990 (7 days' operational service during the peace talks in Bougainville)

Additional information

Service in Bougainville from December 1989 to May 1990, in October 1994 and in July 1997:

1 December 1989 to 31 May 1990. Ministry of Foreign Affairs tasks in Bougainville during a period of high risk to life due to clashes between the militants and Papua New Guinea military and police personnel can now be recognised through the award of the New Zealand Operational Service Medal. Two Ministry of Foreign Affairs served in Bougainville during this period.

October 1994 - Operation Portus. Service in Bougainville between 5 and 19 October 1994 on Operation Portus now also qualifies for the New Zealand Operational Service Medal. Operation Portus involved 13 New Zealand Army personnel who served as part of the South Pacific Peacekeeping Force which supervised and assisted with security during the Bougainville Peace Conference held in Arawa, Bougainville. The other countries which were part of the South Pacific Peacekeeping Force were Australia, Fiji, Tonga and Vanuatu.

July 1997 - Operation Coracle. Service only on Operation Coracle in 1997 will not qualify for a medal by itself. Research by the New Zealand Defence Force has shown that only four days of Operation Coracle meets (or exceeds) the minimum military risk threshold to be deemed operational service for the purposes of medallic recognition. These days are:

a. 3 July 1997 - Operation Coracle Phase 1 - a Royal New Zealand Air Force C-130 Hercules flew into Buka, Bougainville to collect representatives for the peace talks in New Zealand.

b. 23 to 25 July 1997 - Operation Coracle Phase 3 - HMNZS CANTERBURY transported the representatives of the Bougainville Revolutionary Army and Bougainville Transitional Government to southern Bougainville and picked up Papua New Guinea Prisoners of War.

A minimum of seven days operational service (in any operational area since 3 September 1945) is required for the award of the New Zealand Operational Service Medal and a minimum of 30 days operational service in Bougainville since 1989 is required for the award of the New Zealand General Service Medal 1992, with Clasp 'Bougainville'.

Persons who served on Operation Coracle Phases 1 and/or 3 will be able to count one, three or four days towards both the New Zealand Operational Service Medal and the New Zealand General Service Medal 1992, with Clasp 'Bougainville'. They will be able to accumulate this operational service with any other short periods of operational service they undertook towards the relevant medal.

Those who were on HMNZS CANTERBURY from 27 November to 10 December 1997 (14 days' operational service off Bougainville in support of the Truce Monitoring Group) already qualify for the New Zealand Operational Service Medal, as did those who were on board HMNZS CANTERBURY from May to September 1996 (on operational service in the Arabian Gulf as part of the Multinational Interception Force (MIF) ).

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Update on the Long Service Awards Review

23 February 2017

Changes to the eligibility rules for the existing ten New Zealand military long service awards are expected to be announced in the second half of 2017, once the governing Royal Warrants and accompanying regulations are in place.

Additional work is currently being undertaken on the definitions of ‘Efficient Service’ and ‘Character and Conduct’.

As advised on 25 August 2015, the existing long service awards will remain, but the entitlement criteria will allow all eligible New Zealand military service to be counted. For example, service will be able to be accumulated rather than continuous (as is currently required for some awards). This will deliver a fairer system while maintaining the standing of the long service awards.

The appropriate long service award issued will reflect the majority of each recipient’s service. Persons who already have a long service award will continue to wear the award they have. There will be no swapping of awards.

Current serving military personnel will not need to apply for their long service entitlement to be assessed under the new rules. They will be automatically assessed via the data in their SAP HCM records. Please note that given the number of eligible personnel it may take around 12 to 18 months after the announcement to confirm and issue the medal entitlement for every current serving military Service person.

Applications from eligible ex-Service persons will be called for by the end of 2017, once a project team of additional staff has been hired and trained.

Full information on the changes will be released at the time of the formal announcement.

Also see:

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 This page was last reviewed 9 January, 2018 and is current.